The Style Of Your Soul

 

 

What is “the style of your soul”?

It’s the right way to do business, the right way to treat the people, animals and environment of our cool planet. It's what happens when you sit back and daydream about all the bad things we hear of every day in the corporate world and then imagine what they could look like instead. It’s a way of doing business that empowers our customers to be original and unique while also enabling them to do that while feeding back into the world, rather than taking from it. It is the guiding principal of everything we do and every decision we make at Filanthropic. Is simply starts with the question, what is the right thing to do?

 

What does it look like?

 

I have some more questions!

Some things just don’t fit into neat bullet points so we have given a few important items some extra attention just for you! If you have any more questions about The Style Of Your Soul then please send us an email at tellmemore@filanthropic.com and we will be glad to answer them for you. If they are really interesting we will even post them and the answers below!

 

Why do you only give 50% of your profits to charity and not 100%?

This is a great question and one which we get quite often. One of the reasons that charities struggle is because they are so small. Even the world’s biggest charity (United Way) only made $3.9billion in 2013. That might sound like a huge sum of money but it isn’t even half of what the average S&P 500 company made last year in pure profit! Charities stay small because they give away every cent they earn. This is an incredibly admirable thing, but it is this very thing that keeps them small. If you want to grow a business it takes money. You can’t grow a business if you are giving all of your money away. We aren’t satisfied with giving away 100% of the profit we might make selling $10,000 of clothing, instead we want to invest some of that profit in order to create a company that one day will give away $1,000,000 a week. That’s our goal and we will get there.

 

Why are your employees earning salaries that are comparable with big business?

First of all, we are a business and so we are quite comfortable paying our employees a competitive salary. Secondly, we think it is wrong that there is a mind-set that anything for charity should be done for free or on the cheap. We are quite happy for the CEO of a company that overcharges us for their products while using slave labour all over the world to be paid millions of dollars but expect people who are doing great things which are good for our planet to do it out of the kindness of their own hearts. That’s both silly and unfair. We want the best people working for us and you have to pay those kind of people good money!

It’s the right way to do business, it’s the style that enables you to maintain your uniqueness while also creating a real benefit in the world around us. It’s a way of placing people above money and bringing back some old school values. It’s the right way to do business, it’s the style that enables you to maintain your uniqueness while also creating a real benefit in the world around us. It’s a way of placing people above money and bringing back some old school values. It’s the right way to do business, it’s the style that enables you to maintain your uniqueness while also creating a real benefit in the world around us. It’s a way of placing people above money and bringing back some old school values. It’s the right way to do business, it’s the style that enables you to maintain your uniqueness while also creating a real benefit in the world around us. It’s a way of placing people above money and bringing back some old school values.

 

So who is the brains behind Filanthropic?

That'll be me, Warren Batt. Im a regular guy from Manchester in England who now lives in Madrid, Spain with my precious wife Karen and our two little beastly dogs, Plank and Mungo.

 

Where did the idea for Filanthropic come from?

Filanthropic was born out of my confusion with the way that business and charity have always coexisted. Its long been a source of frustration to me that charities, which do so much great work in the world, have been forced to live on just 2 or 3% of GDP which keeps them small and feeble. At the same time as this any charity who has a large overheads are seen as the devil himself.  In the business world any company that makes anything like a 20% profit would be seen as doing really well. That means that it is totally acceptable for them to be spending 80% of their revenues on overheads. If you heard of a charity spending 80% of their income on overheads you would be absolutely disgusted. Many people believe that charities should be spending every penny they make on projects and while this is a grand vision it also explains why charity stays small. Business use their revenues to grow and create bigger revenues. Charities are denied that opportunity by a perception that paying people for their services or promoting those services is somehow a betrayal of their values. I think that is a messed up way of looking at the world. As well as running Filanthropic I also run a charity here in Madrid called Serve the City which has given me a first hand experience of this two class system we have for business and charity. 

I'm also a realist and don't expect the whole world to all of a sudden start thinking differently about charity but that's OK I don't think that is necessary. In fact I believe to make a permanent change we only need a few thousand people to start to think differently, not the consumers who will always buy whichever product gives them the best balance between style, quality and price, but the business owners themselves who have tremendous potential to use their profits to make changes that a single consumer could never manage.